Estelle Kreinik

 By her son, Doug Kreinik

A super mom that is what we lost. An educator, entrepreneur, inventor, manager, mom, grandmother, friend and a very strong independent woman.  She taught us that you could do anything, be anything, and make a difference.

She would ask, "What is the difference between hot water and steam?"  The answer: one degree.  If you make life one degree better for the next person, you will make a difference.  She approached her teaching, her business and her life in that way.

She was a woman of determination, believed in a diverse environment, and loved to cook ethnic foods to find out what made the stomachs of the world happy.   She took classes in history, language, bread baking and knitting. Estelle was fluent in French, studied art and loved textiles.

Born in New York City to the late Dorothy Friedman Stack and JB Stack 94 years ago, she enjoyed the community of many cousins, aunts and uncles. She married Jerry Kreinik and loved him for 65 years.  They had three sons: Ted married to Arlene (Connecticut), Douglas married to Myla (Parkersburg ), and Andrew married to Jacqueline (Baltimore).

Estelle and Jerry were proud and often amazed at the effect of their business ideas.  Kreinik Mfg, the business created out of desperation because of lack of work, became the industry leader espousing the use of silk and metallic threads in embroidery and stitchery.  She was always willing to help friends and associates make their businesses and the industry better.  They won many awards including the much coveted TEN (The Excellence in Needlework Award) from industry members.  Estelle created the first needlework organizer on the market as a solution for the problem of her threads being all over the car when traveling. She used all of her learnings in clothing, language, accounting, customer service and leadership to make a difference in the family business.  

In her move after Jerry's death, people were amazed that a woman 93 years old would just up and leave to live in an independent senior village in Baltimore.  But Mom thrived there.  She met men and woman whose lives had made a difference and who were diverse. The residents as well as the staff loved her.  

She told me in her last days that there were a few things in life that she regretted.  1. That of not convincing Jerry to move to Broadmead in Baltimore five years ago where she had spent a wonderful year.  2. Having missed the big "barn sale" at the senior village were she was looking forward to getting some good deals,  and  3. Not being able to vote on election day with her lady friends.  She felt very strongly about the right to vote.  

She loved life and loved her grandchildren, Julie, Danielle and husband Jon, Charles and Zach.

If you would like to make a donation in her honor, send to Helping Hands at http://www.needleartsmentoring.org/, or the Parkersburg Foundation under the Kreinik Fund http://www.pacfwv.com/

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