How to use the most versatile metallic thread

This is your year of becoming a Kreinik thread expert. Hopefully you've enjoyed and learned from the blog posts so far (access them via the dated list on the right side of this page). To reach the next level, you need to know about one of the cornerstones of the Kreinik line: Fine #8 Braid.

Fine #8 Braid is possibly the most versatile metallic thread since it can be used by just about every creative technique. It is the perfect size for needlepoint, cross stitch, embroidery, crazy quilting, weaving, bead knitting, bead crochet, tatting, fly fishing, card making, Temari, Hardanger, and more. It was the first metallic developed by the Kreinik family in the early days of the thread company.

Doug Kreinik fills us in on a little history: "In the beginning, my parents, Jerry and Estelle Kreinik, looked at the market and saw that there was a need for a metallic for cross stitch and needlepoint." Estelle was a needlepoint enthusiast, which is how they got involved in the industry. "They first created #8 and #16 braids in 7 colors along with blending filaments. The #8 Braid could be used in both needlepoint and cross stitch," Doug adds. "Since then, #8 has been used in crochet, tatting, smocking, weaving, sewing, quilting, embellishing, rug hooking and even fly fishing bodies."

Today we make #8 Braid—we don't get it from overseas or from another company—in our Parkersburg, West Virginia factory. It comes in 250+ colors including basic metallic shades, hi luster, vintage finish, glow-in-the-dark, and holographic. Corded #8 Braid is a bolder version made to resemble real metal threads.

If you haven't used Fine #8 Braid for your creative project, get a spool in your favorite color and try it. You can't hurt it and you will love the bold metallic effect in your design. It brings visual interest, light, and texture that simply makes projects better.

What you need to know about Kreinik Fine #8 Braid

  1. SIZE: The number 8 simply refers to the number of raw strands we use to make the size (or weight). Fine #8 Braid is twice as thick as Very Fine #4 Braid, and half as thick as Medium #16 Braid.
  2. WHY USE IT: To get a bold metallic look in a design (stronger light and visual effect than the whispy Blending Filament, for example). It can be used right alongside other types of fibers—in fact, that makes a design more interesting.
  3. HOW TO USE IT: Straight off the reel. Just cut a length (about 15 to 18 inches) and go. Don't try to separate it or use more than one strand.
  4. WHERE TO USE IT*: This thread was created to be the same thickness as two strands of embroidery floss. So it provides excellent coverage in cross stitch on 14-count Aida. It is also popular for needlepoint in tent stitch on 18-mesh canvas. 
  5. NEEDLE SIZE: Make sure your needle is large enough to accommodate the thread, otherwise the metallic will shred as you stitch. We suggest Tapestry #22 or #24 for needlepoint and cross stitch. For embroidery or quilting on fabric, use a #20 Chenille needle.
  6. CARE: This metallic can be washed by hand or machine. Tumble dry on low. Do not iron directly onto the metallic, use a press cloth.


For more information



* SIDE NOTE ON WHERE TO USE IT: These recommendations are not set in stone—feel free to use other thread sizes on these fabric/canvas counts if desired, or depending on your stitch selection. Some people prefer a lighter look on 14-count Aida, for instance, and instead choose to use Very Fine #4 Braid. Some needlepointers prefer thicker coverage on 18-mesh, so they select slightly heavier Tapestry #12 Braid. Experiment with your own preferences and design needs.



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